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Manufacturers

American Power Devices - APD  Profile

Please click HERE to visit the official American Power Devices - APD website

American Power Devices - APD  Company Overview

American Power Devices, Inc. (APD) is a private company based in Lynn, MA and manufacturer of all types of Diodes. The company does not maintain an active website.

American Power Devices - APD  Products

The types of products manufactured by American Power Devices - APD include Military and commercial diodes, zener diodes, temperature compensated diodes, rectifiers, current regulator diodes, small signal diodes, four layer diodes, computer switching diodes and transient voltage supressors.

American Power Devices - APD Datasheets

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Standard Microcircuit Cross Reference

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